Thursday, January 04, 2007

Varied points on Iraq

Ali Allawi in the Independent:
The Solution

It requires genuine vision and statesmanship to pull the Middle East from its death spiral. The elements of a possible solution are there if the will exists to postulate an alternative to the politics of fear, bigotry and hatred.

The first step must be the recognition that the solution to the Iraq crisis must be generated first internally, and then, importantly, at the regional level. The two are linked and the successful resolution of one would lead to the other.

No foreign power, no matter how benevolent, should be allowed to dictate the terms of a possible historic and stable settlement in the Middle East. No other region of the world would tolerate such a wanton interference in its affairs.

That is not to say that due consideration should not be given to the legitimate interests of the great powers in the area, but the future of the area should not be held hostage to their designs and exclusive interests.

Secondly, the basis of a settlement must take into account the fact that the forces that have been unleashed by the invasion of Iraq must be acknowledged and accommodated. These forces, in turn, must accept limits to their demands and claims. That would apply, in particular, to the Shias and the Kurds, the two communities who have been seen to have gained from the invasion of Iraq.

Thirdly, the Sunni Arab community must become convinced that its loss of undivided power will not lead to marginalisation and discrimination. A mechanism must be found to allow the Sunni Arabs to monitor and regulate and, if need be, correct, any signs of discrimination that may emerge in the new Iraqi state.

Fourthly, the existing states surrounding Iraq feel deeply threatened by the changes there. That needs to be recognised and treated in any lasting deal for Iraq and the area.

A way has to be found for introducing Iran and Turkey into a new security structure for the Middle East that would take into account their legitimate concerns, fears and interests. It is far better that these countries are seen to be part of a stable order for the area rather than as outsiders who need to be confronted and challenged.

The Iraqi government that has arisen as a result of the admittedly flawed political process must be accepted as a sovereign and responsible government. No settlement can possibly succeed if its starting point is the illegitimacy of the Iraqi government or one that considers it expendable.
Brent Scowcroft in the New York Times:
To avoid these dire consequences, we need to secure the support of the countries of the region themselves. It is greatly in their self-interest to give that support, just as they did in the 1991 Persian Gulf conflict. Unfortunately, in recent years they have come to see it as dangerous to identify with the United States, and so they have largely stood on the sidelines.

A vigorously renewed effort to resolve the Arab-Israeli conflict could fundamentally change both the dynamics in the region and the strategic calculus of key leaders. Real progress would push Iran into a more defensive posture. Hezbollah and Hamas would lose their rallying principle. American allies like Egypt, Saudi Arabia and the gulf states would be liberated to assist in stabilizing Iraq. And Iraq would finally be seen by all as a key country that had to be set right in the pursuit of regional security.
The Christian Science Monitor: "If Iraq fragments, what's Plan B?"

8 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

“Thirdly, the Sunni Arab community must become convinced that its loss of undivided power will not lead to marginalisation and discrimination. A mechanism must be found to allow the Sunni Arabs to monitor and regulate and, if need be, correct, any signs of discrimination that may emerge in the new Iraqi state.”

“marginalisation and discrimination”??
Euphemistic bullshit: the civil war has already started.
We must either take sides (presumably with the secular Sunnis and Christians against the Iranian-backed Islamic fundamentalists) and facilitate the partition of Iraq into 3 distinct entities, or get out rapidly before it’s too late i.e. before the Israelis succeed in locking us for eternity inside their Middle-Eastern nightmare.

My old blogging friend Sophie has an interesting post on Louise Arbour and the belated Canadian/UN condemnation of the summary execution of former members of Saddam’s government.

Check out her post: http://lespolitiques.blogspot.com/

“the way justice is being delivered in Iraq?”
It’s delivered the Hebrew-Persian way
By bloody bearded killers high on crack
Yelling “Muqtada” Akbar while they slay

6:40 AM  
Blogger copy editor said...

That is euphemistic bull.

11:20 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

There is absolutely no chance of any movement in the Arab-Israeli front. I do not believe that Israel is interested and I do not think the President has the political power to do anything in that front. Moreover, during the Clinton years none of the supposed Arab friends of US were willing to help US - they left all the heavy lifting to US and sat on the sidelines. I do not think that they are in a position to do any thing either since the Israel-Arab War has become Judaism-Islam War.

12:20 PM  
Blogger Publia said...

But what do you do about the fact that Turkey is Europe and Hezbollah is the rock star of the Mideast?

1:28 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

“That is euphemistic bull.”
;)

“since the Israel-Arab War has become Judaism-Islam War”
Maybe.
Then why do gentile/Infidel kids from Oklahoma have to be used as expandable cannon fodder by anti-American armchair generals such as William Kristol, Paul Wolfowitz, Prince Bindar Bin Bush, Ayatollah Moqtada and other enemies of our civilization?

“Turkey is Europe and Hezbollah is the rock star of the Mideast?”
Last time Turkey was in Europe was 7 centuries ago when it was still called Anatolia.

Hezbollah is indeed quite popular in the largely Sunni Arab world and also among Lebanon’s conservative Christian middle-classin spite of it being an overtly Shiite fundamentalist movement!

This is because, after the execution of Saddam and his secular/Westernized Baathist friends, Hezbollah now enjoys a near-monopoly on the anti-Neocon/anti-Bush political discourse in a “new Middle-East” characterized by the servile submission of most Arab governments to the Bushmert imperial agenda.

The “rock star status” of the Hezb illuminates the “pariah status” of Israel and its American and Arab puppets amongst Muslim masses.

And that doesn’t bode well for the future...

3:23 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

publia:

Turkey is not in Europe and will never be in Europe.

12:50 AM  
Anonymous benjoya said...

presumably with the secular Sunnis and Christians against the Iranian-backed Islamic fundamentalists

you mean the 2% christians and the 20% saudi-backed sunnis? it worked so well in south africa, right?

12:17 PM  
Blogger Chuck said...

Actually, I have reached the point where I can't see a good reason to stop the "death spiral" in the middle east. If we just stand back and let them kill each other they won't have the time to try to hurt us.

All we need to do is to seal them off so they can't get out and put guns and ammunition in several huge piles so they can arm themselves against each other. I would hazard a guess of about 1 year and they will have killed each other off.

Once they are all dead we can just waltz in and start pumping the oil from the wells and oil fields we developed in the first place.

Everybody would be happy then. No need to drill in ANWAR or in the Gulf of Mexico. With all that oil available, muscle car guys like me wouldn't have to be concerned about high prices or low gas milage. Sounds like a win- win scenareo.

Chuck

6:57 PM  

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